Men’s health: hard evidence and home truths

mhw_logo_online_use.pngNext week is Men’s Health Week here in the UK and in the US and Australia. We know men can be a hard to reach bunch when it comes to looking after their health so we thought this would be a great opportunity to highlight some of the health concerns men face, with a series of guest blogs on evidence that can help them make choices about their health. Giving you trusted evidence to inform decisions about health is what the Cochrane Collaboration is all about, but what’s Men’s Health Week about?

Looking for trouble?

vintage coupleIn the UK, Men’s Health Week is led by the charity Men’s Health Forum, which  encourages men to think about and be aware of their health and to see someone when they think something may be wrong. Getting health concerns checked out can be a good thing, of course, but it’s important to wise-up on the possibility of overdiagnosis. In the US Men’s Health Week and Month aims to encourage early detection of disease, but it may do you more harm than good. Doctors Steve Woloshin and Lisa Schwartz explain why in their blog on ‘Men’s Health Weak’, which kicks off our week of special blogs on Monday. They look at the trend for selling disease and at the facts behind the boom in encouraging men to seek testing and treatment for low testosterone. Before you get yourself a testosterone roll-on (FDA-approved), read this blog.

Might your blood pressure pills be letting you down?

vintage man with hand on heartAside from worrying if your testosterone is too low, how about if your blood pressure is too high? Some blood pressure lowering drugs can affect sexual function in men – but do we really know which they are? Check back on Wednesday, when Dr Richard Lehman will be trying to find out from a new Cochrane review of thiazide diuretics for high blood pressure.

Are you health-smart at work?

vintage man in diving suitThis year, in the UK, Men’s Health Week puts the spotlight on health and work. Jani Ruotsalainen from the Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Group has the evidence on how we can get guys to play it safe at work, from surgeons to soldiers up against a range of risks from sex to stereos. Think you know how to stay safe? Wondering if ear defenders are worth the bother? Reckon you’re ok with heavy lifting because you’ve been taught how? You’d be surprised. Check back next Friday to find out more from Jani on ‘Death, Disease and Bulging Machismo’.

You can follow next week events on Twitter @MensHealthForum #mhw14 and, in the US, #menshealthmonth #MensHealth and don’t forget to follow us too @ukcochranecentr so you don’t miss any of our great blogs!


Sarah Chapman

About Sarah Chapman

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Sarah's work as a Knowledge Broker at Cochrane UK focuses on disseminating Cochrane evidence through social media, including Evidently Cochrane blogs, blogshots and the ‘Evidence for Everyday’ series for nurses, midwives, allied health professionals and patients. A former registered general nurse, Sarah has a particular interest making evidence accessible and useful to practitioners and to others making decisions about health. Before joining Cochrane, Sarah also worked on systematic reviews for the University of Oxford and the Royal College of Nursing Institute, and obtained degrees in History from the University of Oxford and in the history of women’s health and illness in early modern England (MPhil., University of Reading).

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