Pregabalin for neuropathic pain: balancing benefits and harms

In this blog, Sarah Chapman looks at the latest Cochrane evidence on the benefits and harms of pregabalin for neuropathic pain and reflects on her husband’s experience of finding a balance between them.

I suspect that people who live with chronic health conditions know a lot about balance. About the trade-offs that need to be considered when it comes to activities, perhaps; about adjustments made to diet, rest or medication to keep things level, or at least within the realms of what feels acceptable. Adding a new treatment threatens that balance. There is the hope it will bring benefits, but it might cause unwelcome side-effects. Here’s a new thing to juggle.

I’ve seen this up close over the past year, as my husband Tim has been living with neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain comes from nerve damage, from a variety of causes and sometimes an unknown cause. It may not respond well to what we think of as ‘painkillers’ and other types of drugs may be tried. When Tim found no relief with various painkillers, his GP suggested pregabalin, an anti-epileptic drug that can be effective for relief of neuropathic pain. Can be. It’s also associated with side-effects, especially dizziness and sleepiness, and Tim has had rather too much experience of dizziness as a result of another condition. Yet he was willing to chance it. “At this point, I was awake for much of the night in intense pain, too tired to stand up and in too much pain to lie down. I was in a very difficult place. I was prepared to take anything that was offered, and I’d heard good things about pregabalin from health professional colleagues. I was warned by my GP about side-effects but I’d have taken bigger risks to get rid of the pain.”

So began a period of juggling, trying to find the right balance. Months down the line, we were very interested to see the publication of a Cochrane Review on the benefits and harms of pregabalin for adults with neuropathic pain. What information would this offer for others making decisions about taking it?

New Cochrane evidence on pregabalin

The review includes 45 studies (lasting two to 16 weeks) with almost 12000 adults. Most people had postherpetic neuralgia (pain after shingles), diabetic neuropathy or mixed neuropathic pain and the review looks at the evidence for people grouped by condition and also altogether. Oral pregabalin at daily doses of 150mg, 300mg and 600mg were compared with placebo.

Pain reduction for some

The bottom line of the review is that oral pregabalin is helpful for some people with chronic neuropathic pain, but it isn’t possible to know who will benefit and who won’t. At doses of 300mg and 600mg, it probably has an important effect in some people with moderate or severe neuropathic pain after shingles or due to diabetes, and it may be effective for some after trauma due to stroke or spinal cord injury. It is probably not effective for pain in people with HIV. There isn’t reliable evidence on the effects of pregabalin on other types of neuropathic pain.

How much pain reduction is worthwhile?

A very personal consideration perhaps, but pain intensity reduction of at least 50% has been identified as a useful treatment outcome by people with chronic neuropathic pain and is associated with important benefits for sleep, fatigue, depression, work and quality of life. The evidence in the review suggests that more than half of those taking pregabalin won’t get this much pain relief: around three or four people out of ten, compared with one or two taking placebo.

Possible harms

The review has high-certainty evidence about harms, so the review authors feel confident that future research is not likely to paint a very different picture, although they note that the effects of pregabalin on sexual function may not be well represented in the trials and nor was the issue of substance abuse with pregabalin addressed.

Serious side effects were rare and were not different between those taking pregabalin and those taking placebo tablets. However, less serious adverse events were common, particularly dizziness and sleepiness. Out of ten people taking pregabalin, six or seven will experience one or more adverse event, though so will five or six out of ten people taking placebo.

Taking all the neuropathic pain conditions together, the results show a minimal increase in the rate of adverse events at a daily dose of 600mg compared with 300mg, while in general the 150mg dose did not produce an excess of adverse events, except sleepiness in people with neuropathic pain following shingles.

The challenges for future research include providing information about who is likely to benefit and how the drug can be titrated to minimize adverse events.

Benefits and harms: a personal balancing act

 Tim increased his pregabalin dose slowly, as advised, but it took some experimentation to get the dose ‘right’ for him. “At 200mg it got rid of the pain and allowed me to sleep at night, but I was falling asleep all the time during the day. Going down to 100mg I had pain in the night again. Settling at 150mg a day it’s debatable whether I’ve got the best or the worst of both worlds – I’m still sleepy during the day but I’m not too sleepy to work, and I still have some pain but it’s manageable.”

But that’s not all. Tim explains: “I’m enjoying the trippy dreams and I’m feeling more relaxed than I’ve felt in my life – which is really great! These side effects are benefits for me! What’s less good is that I sometimes lose bits of time; I can find it hard to remember what I did earlier in the day or the day before. Yet I am also thinking more clearly; when I’m working, being more relaxed seems to mean that my recall of systems and activities is sharper. How much is down to the pregabalin I don’t know – but don’t take it away!”

A complex reality

Of course, it’s complicated. Neuropathic pain is only one facet of Tim’s health profile and pregabalin one treatment among several. As he acknowledged, it’s not certain that everything he describes is down to the pregabalin. There’s guesswork, trial and error, in the mix, even with this new evidence providing more information than was previously available.

What matters to each of us differs and that could be crucial in decisions about treatments. A side effect that is intolerable to me might not bother you. It’s complicated. Once recommendations and decisions about a treatment have been made, hopefully informed by the best available evidence, collecting a drug from the pharmacy may be just the beginning of a long and complex relationship, as we discover what it does for and to us, and how it fits (or doesn’t) in the day-to-day business of managing our health.

Join in the conversation on Twitter with @SarahChapman30 @CochraneUK @CochranePaPaS or leave a comment on the blog.

Reference: Derry  S, Bell  RF, Straube  S, Wiffen  PJ, Aldington  D, Moore  RA. Pregabalin for neuropathic pain in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2019, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD007076. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD007076.pub3.

Sarah Chapman has nothing to disclose.



Pregabalin for neuropathic pain: balancing benefits and harms by Sarah Chapman

is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International

45 Comments on this post

  1. Avatar

    I was recently prescribe Pregabain (50mg) 3x/day for a femoral nerve compression at my L3 and found immediate relief in the “electric” shooting/stabbing pain across my hip and down my leg. While it hasn’t fully removed the pain, it has made it so I can function well through-out the day and sleep “ok” at night. Pregabalin is only being used to help manage the pain until we determine the next step (Steroid Injection or surgery to open the femoral opening). I was on Hydrocodone-Acetominophen prior (prescribed by my G.P.) and it literally did nothing for my pain. Pregabalin has worked incredibly well for my nerve pain. I’ve been prescribed Pregablin by a Spinal Pain Specialist and not a General Practitioner. I’ve been fortunate enough not to have any side-effects. Prescriptions are “nasty” and vary in effectiveness. I felt it was important to write this post so people reading this could also understand that it isn’t all bad and that there are people using Pregablin well without issue.

    I am sorry the folks here are having issues and do believe that you may want to seek second opinions or see specialists if you don’t think your doctor has a full understanding of how to use the medications. My best to all of you I was in horrible constant pain for months on end trying my best every day to do basic functions with no sleep and it was the most difficult thing I’ve had to live with. Thank You.

    Serena McKnight / Reply
  2. Avatar

    I had Labrynthitis around four weeks ago, plus I had been suffering from lower back pain for around seven months for which I was prescribed Tramadol. My Dr prescibed 50mg Pregabalin and the Tramadol until I can get an MRI Scan. The Labrynthitis made me dizzy , strange loss of balance and lasted for a round two weeks until I felt maybe 50% back to noral though I am still deaf in my right ear. Then he increased my Pregabalin to 75mg twice daily as I could hardly move with my back pain nd I couldn’t sleep lying on either side or on my back or front so ended up fallin asleep in the chair after taking 2 Tramadol 50mg 2 Pragabalin 75mg and one diazepam 2mg to actually fall asleep then wake up to find no extreme back pain, but my left leg from the knee down was pins and needles and I was hardly able to stand on it. The longer I stood up the worse pain the left leg gave me. The Dr has now prescribed 100mg Pregabalin to attempt kill the pain from an expected trapped lower back nerve. So for me Pregabalin is a bit ofa saviour but if it had been prescribed 100mg at first I possibly would have not suffered the way I have with y back pain yet in saying that I feel the Dr has been correct in upping the does gradually until he finds I am able to control my back pain.

    Bob / Reply
    • Avatar

      My husband has been taking Lyrica for some time now . He is always sleepy , sometimes dizzy . Concentration is dreadful ( I don’t feel safe as a passenger with him whilst he is driving). His memory is dreadful . I feel in some ways I’ve lost my husband and I can pin point it to the time he started taking Lyrica ( it does help the nerve pain resulting from diabetes) , but I feel it has cost him his personality and fullness of life . He is reluctant to see doctor results same as he says he doesn’t want neuropathy to return . I get that , but I’m very concerned about him

      Hilary Turkington / (in reply to Bob) Reply
      • Avatar

        Hi Hilary, how old is your husband? I’m experiencing a very similar situation and am at a loss of what to do. We are expecting our second child and I feel like I’ve lost my partners help.

  3. Avatar

    Nerve pain can be caused by different illnesses including diabetes and shingles, or an injury. It says that Pregabalin works in different ways: in epilepsy it stops seizures by reducing the abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

    Samantha Scott / Reply
    • Avatar

      I’m having alot of the same side effects as Tim which are good I feel more relaxed at work not stressing calm. Which is great. I’m getting more done because I’m not in pain sleep hasn’t been great not sure if that has to do with meds …..I was stated on 25mg an the first day or so then move to 50mg in morning an the 50mg at night. Im being treated for cervical stenosis. I’m 41 an trying to avoid surgery.Just started my Lyrica so we will see where it goes so far I am very pleased with results. Especially no pain like I’m use too.

      Jennifer Robinson / (in reply to Samantha Scott) Reply
    • Avatar

      Nerve pain can also be caused by quinolones like cipro. I wonder how many of these patients have used quinolones which may have caused the symptoms.

      Nellie / (in reply to Samantha Scott) Reply
  4. Avatar

    Hi I have an elderly client who has early Alzheimers and was on Lyrica for neuropathic pain post shingles. She was always an anxious person however lately with changes happening in her life and circumstances she became more and more paranoid. To the point that it appeared her dementia was getting worse fast. Recently her GP took her off this medication and I am excited to see if the trippy dream she was having and the blanks in her memory were related to the medication.

    Yvonne / Reply
  5. Avatar

    i have been on Lyrica for 8 years now along with hydrocodone for the pain and the Lyrica is ridiculous, it is so difficult I have been trying to taper off of it for years and it seems like this stuff has to be the most addictive drug on the planet. when you reduce you literally should not reduce by more than 50 mg change per day and do that for at least a month, if you tolerated that then do another but even then it is very common to have migrains, worse pain, nervous limbs, back ache, and all over nervousness so you may just have to suffer through that for at least a week before you start to normalize. I literally lost the first 4 years I was on it because i was taking 300mg per day and i wouldnt remember where I was , couldn’t form words i know well. I am finally down to 100 mg per day and just started this week trying to cut 50 mg per day and still have a lot of the weirdness that comes with getting off of it. i actually came here because I was wondering if the Lyrica could CAUSE neuropathic pain because I am now on a spinal cord stimulator for pain and it has changed my life but i still have this 2-4 level pain i think might be because I am still on the Lyrica. Anyway, I am so sorry for all of you out there in pain but please hold on and don’t give up! Also it is very important to find a psychologist that can help you deal with pain because the mental becomes a huge part of your life when pain is a constant. God Bless you all and I wish you the best!

    Heith Foster / Reply
  6. Avatar

    I have been on lyrica for two years now I experience confusion memory loss depression bad anxiety and dizziness and trouble sleeping at night Iv gained weight thought to be caused by too much alcohol use now cause my doctor said I have fibromyalgia and degenerative disc disease in my back with out lyrica I would not be able to function with the pain but I also don’t like the side effects or long term effects that may never go away I don’t think I will be normal again I’m very blah I’m not sure what to do at this point I feel happier with a beer but I also suffer from severe depression and ptsd so I’m just messed up in every direction in my life and my sex life sucks I have no interest my poor husband I am confused and trying now to quite drinking and dealing with that is hard too so very afraid of with draw all from both lyrica and my alcohol my husband says I’m not the same person he used to know that hurts I have horrible mental depression anxiety ptsd Iv just had enough😢😢

    Lenore / Reply
    • Sarah Chapman

      So sorry…that all sounds really hard. So much to contend with.
      For anyone trying to quit drinking, it’s worth thinking about whether Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) can help (and they say they are for anyone “If you seem to be having trouble with your drinking, or if your drinking has reached the point of where it worries you”) https://www.alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk/Home A Cochrane Review published earlier this year on ‘Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12-step programmes for alcohol use disorder’ has high quality evidence that AA is more effective than other established treatments, such as cognitive behavioural therapy, for increasing abstinence from alcohol. The review is here https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD012880.pub2/full

      Wishing you all the very best and better times ahead
      Sarah (blogger and Editor)

      Sarah Chapman / (in reply to Lenore) Reply
  7. Avatar

    Thank you Sarah for this post and individuals should not rely upon pain-killers because at some point it will stop working.

    Dr. David Greene / Reply
    • Avatar

      I beg to differ, if you were in pain all of the time you would too. When your life is pain it is all consuming, you cant feel, you can’t love, you just exist for unending suffering. I am so tired of the medical community and worse politicians telling people in pain not to rely on the one thing that makes life live able. Precisely because you don’t understand what its like you think that saving people from overdose is more important than giving them relief from pain and that is an absolutely and completely false narrative put out by people that don’t care to know the truth. I am sorry to slam you but I have born the brunt of this political lie in my life trying to get medication that for me is saving my life. The truth that you and most politicians don’t care to know is that we who have unending pain welcome death from overdose. Maybe not every day but i have been there where you take just a little more than you are supposed to and maybe have a few drinks as well because even though you don’t necessarily want to die you welcome the peace from pain it would bring. if some day it stops working we dont care because we need to live in this moment of pain. If someday it kills us from liver failure or some other far off and distant fear normals might think about we don’t care because we are living in an unending agony that crowds out all thought except to make it stop. Why not instead of screwing with our ability to get pain meds you come up with some way for us to get free from the insanity that is pain. By the way i am not picking on you specifically but I have paid hundreds of well meaning idiots (doctors) that sit in their comfort and tell me what i ought to want and I will not listen to it anymore. If you are out there and in pain, dump your doctor if they don’t have a remedy other than to tell you what not to do.

      Chronic Neuropathic pain >8 years / (in reply to Dr. David Greene) Reply
    • Avatar

      Thank you for telling the patients side. This persons statement on pain is spot-on. I am a 56 yr male and at 15 was told i had an ‘old mans back’. I’ve had to lie to just about every Dr. I’ve seen. I even had one tell me i had to take the knock-off T3’s to lower the ‘street value’. I EAT THEM……Why is it that a DR. takes what i say with a grain of salt and decides their treatment instead of ‘mine’ ? Pain in some people is a debilitating fact of life.

      Gord Rasmussen / (in reply to Dr. David Greene) Reply
  8. Avatar

    Lyrica ruined my life. I had an undiagnosed joint problem in my hip and my GP prescribed me Lyrica. I was on a maximum dose of 75 mls for three years. I gained a dangerous amount of weight (which IMMEDIATELY started to drop when I stopped taking it. I suffered aphasia, and numbness/ tingling in my legs. I also became deficient in calcium and vitamin D and had to be hospitalised. This was nothing compared to the withdrawal. My GP insisted there would be no withdrawals and so I stopped taking it. I experienced four months of hallucinations, depersonalisation, derealisation, insomnia, restless limbs, suicidal impulses… it felt like it would never end and in many ways it didn’t. Three and a half years later I have excruciating facial pain with “unknown cause”. It started precisely as I came off Lyrica and I’d never had it before. No doctor or specialist will entertain the idea that any withdrawal could have happened. I’m now essentially disabled, I never leave the house, I have no life. Pfizer will never be held to account for using the opioid crisis to promote their drug off label while ignoring the catastrophic effects. I feel that the wording in this article is very unscientific and feels like a typical marketing piece. I’d like the author to think about the damage she is inflicting on so many people.

    L Newman / Reply
    • Avatar

      Additionally please join the Lyrica Survivors Facebook group for advice on how to taper off safely and not end up like me.

      L Newman / (in reply to L Newman) Reply
    • Avatar

      It isn’t opioid and you do have your own control over your weight.

      Reg Sealey / (in reply to L Newman) Reply
  9. Avatar

    I was put on pregabalin a week ago for nerve damage to foot due to a cast that was too tight, and they refused to remove.. after the runs, uncontrolled shaking, extreme temp changes, headaches blurred vision, one day my vision almost completely disappeared l stopped taking it . Telling the doctor long before all thes symptoms occurred. Then I had headaches and nausea sicknee ant to make it better now I have lumber pain which makes me feel sick and I can’t lean back only being to write this now ,some sight back but my eyes hurt even wearing glasses. The damaging cast was for a broken leg in Jan. 2020 before lockdown ,forgotten, still needs surgery.
    This medication sometimes made my foot feel alive again, but never took pain or heat away.

    Angela Scaife / Reply
  10. Avatar

    I have just started taking this medication and so have not had any side affects, as yet ,but wanted to be prepared for any developments.
    ,

    Margaret Forrester / Reply
  11. Avatar

    I’m very interested to know about the length of these studies. Lyrica often seems to help at first and then the side effects can kick in 6 months or even years later. The longer people are taking it, the worse the side effects become. It is highly addictive and absolutely the worst medication a doctor can prescribe for anxiety. For some, yes, it does help neuropathic pain in the short-term. In the long-term however it can actually increase it or cause it in people who never had it before. This is a drug that should never be used to replace opiates or other pain medications and that’s exactly what is happening with the war on opioids. instead of actually solving any problem all the doctors are doing are finding an equally addictive and frankly often more destructive medication to replace them. I have run the Lyrica survivors group for almost 10 years now and we have over 10000 members. Pfizer has blocked searches for support groups for Lyrica and their other brand-name drugs on Facebook… That should tell you something about the duplicitous nature of this company.

    In our group we try to provide alternatives to medications and this has been largely successful for many members. Rather than throwing medications at pain, it can actually be handled in many cases with holistic treatments, supplements, dietary and lifestyle changes. If people need an alternative to Lyrica or are looking for support because their withdrawals are extreme, please reach out to us for help. we hope to reach as many people and stop the suffering at this drug is causing for a thousands upon thousands of people.

    https://www.facebook.com/groups/LyricaSurvivors/

    Amy Ireland / Reply
    • Avatar

      This group is amazing, I really wish I’d joined it earlier to learn how to taper down safely. It helped me a lot in terms of support though :-)

      L Newman / (in reply to Amy Ireland) Reply
  12. Avatar

    What can I do for burning feet at night, I would love a nights sleep.

    doreen Churchman / Reply
  13. Avatar

    I have many symptoms from taking pregabalin, every symptom I’ve read about on this forum I’ve got or had. I am 60yrs old, female have type one diabetes. After having 2 children I had an X. ray
    for chronic back pain the result showed I had a fractured T. 6 vertebrae, the only treatment prescribed was Dihydrocodeine. Later I developed two collapsed vertebrae mid thoracic and 3 crush fractures in my lumber spine. Now after having diabetes 47yrs, with only the diagnosis of Post Pregnancy Osteoporosis for my back, rheumatoid arthritis in my hands, no cartiledge in my knees, and glorious fibromyalgia I would welcome the coronovirus. Pregabalin has beaten me for
    I have tried many times to bin it but ….it’s just too addictive.
    Just now I’m anxious, hot, and tired and need to sleep it’s the only way to cope. Laying on my back is only possible for a few minutes, and my knees hurt too much when knee to knee on my side, then my legs are so sensitive they throb constantly. If only I could get some sleep at night things could be different.
    God this is one long moan so sorry has anyone got a solution a large revolver perhaps?

    Mrs Kay Handford

    Kay Handford / Reply
  14. Avatar

    It’s back!! I had nerve pain a couple years ago from the neck down the left arm, went on Pregabalin to relieve pain as I could not sleep laying down (slept in my lazy boy half sitting up). Just the other day I had shooting pain in my left breast area and going to the arm pit, thought it was a heart issue and went to ER…all tests were negative and I forgot to tell them about my past experience, the doc thought it was a pulled muscle and off I went. Two nights later I cant sleep and now I need the meds for pain relief.
    My question is how does this happen? I had no injury that I could tell I hurt something.I am very active for my age (60) hockey, baseball,walking the dog and bicycle riding.I should also say the side effects a pretty bad but if it takes the pain away I will do it again!! I am still working but I am not going in to put myself through the pain this time.

    Doug / Reply
  15. Avatar

    I am on Lyrica for pain and finding it difficult to find the right dose with my GP. I have being on it before for referred pain and got myself off. Unfortunately l have pain again after removing appendix operation
    It like it’s started the gut on pain that goes into lower back. Doctors done CT scan but can see nothing visible. The pain is very bad and unless l take tramadol with paracetamol for it l find it unbearable. I can’t take these because they create severe constipation. I being left with no choices but Lyrica. I hope and pray they find out what causing the pain so l can come off Lyrica. I have no life with pain. Does anyone know in Ireland what l can do to find what causing this pain. I
    would be greatful for any suggestions.
    Mary’s

    Mary / Reply
  16. Avatar

    It made me nauseous and gave me a lovely headache.

    andre / Reply
  17. Avatar

    I have been on Pregabalin for about 10 years on and off. I tolerate very well and have no side affects whatsoever. I was prescribed it for generalised anxiety. I was very sceptical about taking at first as I never thought it would work. But the next day the anxiety was gone. This is how effective I find pregabalin. I know its not down to any form of placebo affect as like I stated, I never thought it would work. I now have sciatica and am in a lot of pain. My GP has increased the dose considerably, but I have never found it works reducing pain unfortunately. I have never found it addictive and am able to come off without any issues. I know of people who were prescribed it for neuropathic pain and have got addicted to it because they are using it as a “chill pill”. I have not experienced this and thankfully all it does is relieves the anxiety.

    Stuart Brown / Reply
    • Avatar

      Hi, I have suspected neuropathy and the doctor has prescribed me Pregabalin, I’m very sceptical and worried to take due to the side effects! A few people have mentioned they had to take such high doses for pain relief which I don’t want to take! Am I over thinking this?? I have pains and numbness in hands and feet all the time it’s awful! Few people mentioned trying alternative medicines so I have got some lipoic acid and b vitamins and hoping they may help, but I feel like these tablets are going to be my only option! All I read about is negative reviews, yours is probably the first semi positive one I’ve come across!

      Candy / (in reply to Stuart Brown) Reply
  18. Avatar

    I’ve been on pregabalin for 4 years now and it Is highly addictive.
    It helps me with anxiety but makes my nerves worse and I shake alot.
    I’m also aware in prisons in the UK it’s prescribed like smarties and there’s 1000s of people on it.
    I really wish I could come off it but now I’m stuck on it and can’t as I become depressed, anxious and can’t leave the house unless I take it.
    Stay well away from it if your offered it and look for an alternative as once your on it, it’s extremely hard to come off.
    I’ve heard herion addicts say it’s worse coming off pregabalin than herion and the worse detox of their life’s.
    Ill say it again stay well away from it as I’m tired all day, can’t function properly and now classed as disabled as a result and got severe mental health problems

    Buster brown / Reply
  19. Avatar

    I have just started taking pregabalin for diabetic neuropathy and am taking 75 mg twice a day. Right now I am finding that the medication seems to increase the pain in my feet and not reduce it in any way. Hopefully this is only temporary and i manage to receive some benefit from further medicating myself.

    Bob Harvey / Reply
    • Avatar

      Hi bob, I was taking 75mg and found it didn’t work and made there pain worse. GP upped my does to 100mg yesterday and I Found the pain had become worse, Iv had the worst night sleep yet. The pain in my foot is unbearable!
      Keeping fingers crossed that it soon kicks in and works.

      Nikita Williams / (in reply to Bob Harvey) Reply
    • Avatar

      im having same trouble now with lyrica. Im torn between if its working at all or making worse I really don’t know. right now im off it 4 days trying to survive through it. did you find anything that works?

      mike / (in reply to Bob Harvey) Reply
      • Avatar

        Hi I have been prescribed Pregabalin for neuropathy, haven’t started taking them yet as concerned about the side effects being worse and adding to the problem, did you finally get any relief?? I’m at a loss
        Kind regards

        Candy / (in reply to mike) Reply
  20. Avatar

    This was an interesting article. What kills me is that doctors really do not know a thing about his medication, but prescribe it anyway. It is very well known that in reality no one knows how it works on the nervous system, or why. However, once again, as with so many things in the health field, there just isnt anything else. So we guinea pig ourselves, because lets be honest, being in pain 24/7 is not for anyone and life goes on. The thing I agree most on here is the balance between pain and feeling like nutcase. This is a very delicate balance, and it will be very different for EVERYONE. There is no perfect potion. Of course Phizer being the money grubbing self serving people that they are, made sure that the pills cant be cut, using the other pill form, but I found a way around that, just open it and put it in water if you have to cut it down. Generics have been authorized finally as well, so the 4.2 billion made is now going to have to be shared. I have found that nerves go nuts at night, for me taking this crap during the day just makes me nuts. I take one pill 75mgs in them morning and that is it. I deal with the bit of pain I have. At night however, I take 300mgs starting at 5pm, then 7pm, then around 8pm, and 10pm these are all 75mg pills, and for some odd reason, I cant handle the 100 mgs at a time. Weird I know. This cuts the pain off at night, ( most of it), and allows me to sleep. I will also say that I have experienced dry mouth, dehydration like feelings with water retention. ( honestly I have never taken longer pee’s then on this medication ever! in the morning). I have tried to keep this medication as low as possible, but what I have also found is that there is a backlash to taking it. Your nerves react to the medication by acting out against it and becoming more aggressive, therefore leaving you with having to take more medication to get them to calm down. This is just my experience. The medication wears off after 4 to 6 hours, ( one pill), and some doctors would say to take them all day long, but of course they themselves have not been on it. Unfortunately, this has been labeled a times medication, making it hard to try different dosses, and leaving pharmacists looking at you weird when you come in to get your meds, and you have changed a dose etc. Believe me if I didnt have to take this crap I wouldnt. I am not sure why they labeled it timed because the side effects are less then positive. I dont know many people who are like hey! give me some more of that drug that makes me feel nuts, dizzy, gain weight, dry mouth, and like im on acid all day, and MAYBE take away a bit of pain, but thats just me. I have found a way to make this medication work for me, but I say that loosely. It works a bit, not perfect. But hey that is all there is!!!

    Christa / Reply
  21. Avatar

    I was put on Pregabalin for anxiety 2 years ago by a psychiatrist, it helped initially for 3 months but then your body gets used to it and you need higher and higher doses which I couldn’t tolerate, the side effects were awful, memory loss, blurred vision, tinnititus, rapid heart beat, insomnia and depression and it made anxiety worse….I have now been tapering off it for 18 months very slowly and it’s been a nightmare – all of the above as well as bad nausea and joint pain, I’m nearly off it but there is not doubt in my mind that your body becomes dependent on it and coming off it is very difficult. My GP is now in agreement with me and will not prescibe it. In America there is even a support group of over 8000 people called Lyrica Survivors which has more evidence of people struggling to come off it, mostly people whom were given it for pain relief. I have done a lot of research into it and I know that it has a very addictive quality and it has now become a ‘street drug’. Please warn people of the side effects and withdrawal problems.

    Clare Baillieu / Reply
  22. Avatar

    I was on Pregabalin for a very short time and tapered off it which was hell. 7 months down the line I am suffering still from tinnitus, visual disturbance, horrendous sweating and strange feeling of being high which toward the end of the day turns to a sickening feeling. The doctor will not except the Pregabalin caused all this upset to my life but I know it was. As she refuses to believe me I am left with no help in a state of despair not knowing how much longer I can deal with this or where it is going to end it is a truly horrendous place to be and any advice on how I could move forward would be gratefully received. How can I make the doctor see the drug she gave me is infact making my life hell 7 months after I stopped taking it? I have chatted to others and we have concluded some people have a real bad time when ceasing to take this drug even if they have only taken it for a short time. I would say it is worrying but it is far more than that I would say its life threatening due to the daily despair.

    Tracy Davies / Reply
  23. Avatar

    I’m on this for pain in my feet it works for me.

    Sheila Godfrey / Reply
    • Avatar

      How much do you take for foot pain. I, too, just started Lyrica for foot pain (neuropathy). I take 75 mg twice daily. How long did it take before you had relief? I’m unable to walk because of this. Please answer.

      Millie Richardson / (in reply to Sheila Godfrey) Reply
  24. Avatar

    I was a GP and my main problem with pregabalin was that it was widely abused in the community and had a marked street value. In addition, once patients were taking it they had problems stopping it, mainly with anxiety. I got the impression pregabalin is addictive and I tried to use as little possible

    Christopher Johnstone / Reply
    • Avatar

      The thing with anxiety is that, those that suffer with it, just wish to lead a normal life, free from the fears their bodies are not able to control naturally. Most patients on pregabalin for anxiety have already likely been on various medications, ranging from beta blockers, SSRI, SNRI, benzo’s etc.
      Its a simple case of the individual weighing up the pro’s and cons of all treatments, in in that sense, pregabalin seems to offer a better pay off against the negatives of the other treatments, in that its onset is much quicker than anti depressants, and less addictive than benzo’s.
      Everyone would be taking benzo’s everyday if it were not for the horrific withdrawals and the duration of such.
      Pregabalin offers an excellent way to supplement treatment with an antidepressant while it takes effect

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*